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Law of the Plainsman

Post by cowgirl » Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:32 pm

westpoint64:49474 wrote:Too bad that this show didn't last longer, as I liked Michael Ansara's Sam Buckhart character...but from what I've seen, the episodes were kinda ordinary, with the usual plot line and cliches of its time. I think maybe they were going for trying to get a big hero/cute kid pairing a la TR.
Awhile back, I saw some website where Ansara mentions Four Star and the show. Ansara said he liked working on LOTP and that he felt that Four Star tended to treat actors better than other TV production companies of its time. That could've had something to do with the fact that the company was formed by four actors and was being run by actor Dick Powell.
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Re: Law of the Plainsman

Post by cowgirl » Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:33 pm

ralphm1999:51067 wrote:
westpoint64:49474 wrote:Too bad that this show didn't last longer, as I liked Michael Ansara's Sam Buckhart character...but from what I've seen, the episodes were kinda ordinary, with the usual plot line and cliches of its time. I think maybe they were going for trying to get a big hero/cute kid pairing a la TR.
Awhile back, I saw some website where Ansara mentions Four Star and the show. Ansara said he liked working on LOTP and that he felt that Four Star tended to treat actors better than other TV production companies of its time. That could've had something to do with the fact that the company was formed by four actors and was being run by actor Dick Powell.
I worked with Michael Ansara often.  I liked working with him as he was so gentlemanly and friendly to everyone on the set.  In the late 1950s there were so many Westerns being filmed that it was almost impossible to invent new plots.   When I was on set in The Black Saddle I used to try to think of a plot to try to sell it to the studio.  No matter what came to my mind it had already been used.  

You are right about 4 Star.  It was a real family oriented studio.  Dick Powell regularly visited the stages of all the 4 Star productions and chatted with all of us (including stand-ins) as if we were equals.   Once I worked on a set when Ida Lupino was directing and she was as down to Earth as could be with everyone (not to mention a few choice words).  I already mentioned it somewhere else, but once again, each Christmas season 4 Star had a huge party on one of the large stages for all the 4 star employees and contract actors.   A band, buffet tables with every kind of food, booze, dancing and if they were in town the 4 owners of 4 Star.  Most of the series regulars made an appearance at the party.  Of course we regular stand-ins were always invited.   :cool:
"Keep your 'sites' on The Rifleman"
"The Rifleman hits the 'Mark' every week on abc."
A cowgirl's work is never done.

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